Third Degree Murder Charge for Derek Chauvin Dropped, All Others Charges Remain

A Hennepin County District Court Judge on Wednesday night chose to sustain eight of the nine total charges against the four defendants in the death of George Floyd while he was in the custody of the Minneapolis Police Department. 

In a 107-page ruling, Judge Peter A. Cahill dropped Derek Chauvin’s third-degree murder charge, but sustained second-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter charges against the former Minneapolis police officer.

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Reports: Biden’s Tax Plan Would Increase Taxes Across the Board, Estimates Vary by How Much

Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden’s proposed tax increases of nearly $4 trillion over the next 10 years, if passed, “would be the highest in American history – indeed, in world history,” an analysis of his plan determined.

Lew Uhler, founder and chairman of the National Tax Limitation Committee and National Tax Limitation Foundation (NTLF), and Peter Ferrara a senior policy adviser to NTLF, made that conclusion in a new report published by The Hill.

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Two Ohio Educational Strikes Come to an End

Two strikes that impacted large educational institutions in Ohio each ended in less the week.

Gahanna-Jefferson teachers ended their walkout, which began Oct. 12, following a membership vote Sunday. That followed faculty and staff at Youngstown State University ending its three-day strike Oct. 15 after reaching an agreement on a framework for a contract.

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Ohio Senate President Tweets Zero Chance of Raising Taxes

Ohio State Senate President Larry Obhof responded plainly to a tweet from a Cleveland-area think tank encouraging the state to close income tax loopholes.

“Let me save you some time on this. There is 0% chance @OhioSenateGOP will raise income taxes,” Obhof tweet at Policy Matters Ohio.

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Pew: At Least 17 States Have Drawn from Their Rainy Day Funds This Year to Cover Fiscal Shortfalls

At least 17 states have authorized and or made withdrawals from their rainy day funds this year in order to fill budget holes, according to a new analysis by The Pew Charitable Trusts. Some withdrawals were small, others were more than half of what was set aside.

In fiscal 2020, at least 36 states had planned to make additional rainy day fund deposits but were constrained by fiscal and economic difficulties resulting from their respective state COVID-19 shutdowns, which resulted in increased unemployment and decreased revenue.

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Senators Introduce Bill to Amend Rule Over Third-Party Internet Content

In the wake of allegations of big tech companies suppressing political speech and news stories on their platforms, Republican senators and congressmen introduced legislation to amend Section 230, part of a federal code that regulates third-party content on the internet.

Federal Communication Communications (FCC) Chairman Ajit Pai also weighed in on Thursday after senators announced they were subpoenaing Twitter’s CEO Jack Dorsey.

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Nearly 900,000 U.S. Workers File New Unemployment Claims

Nearly 900,000 American workers filed new claims for unemployment benefits last week, an increase of 53,000 new claims from the week prior and a sign that the U.S. economy has a long way to go to recovery.

According to U.S. Department of Labor satistics released Thursday, 898,000 new claims were filed in the week ending Oct. 10, when seasonally adjusted. That’s up from the previous week’s revised level of 845,000 claims.

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Ohio Voters Flock to the Polls Thus Far in Early Voting

Ohio’s first week of early voting saw long lines at major cities and record numbers of Ohioans heading to the polls.

Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose said in a news release Tuesday that triple the number of early voters have gone to the polls this year than at the same point in 2016.

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