Data Shows Increased Homicides in Six Major Cities Across the Country

Police line do not cross tape

The number of homicides in six major cities across the country has increased compared to last year, disproportionately affecting black people, according to crime data.

Black people have represented a massive share of murder victims in six major cities through the first six months of 2021 compared to last year, which itself saw a large crime surge, according to data analyzed by the Daily Caller News Foundation. The DCNF analyzed both police department data and homicide reports compiled by local news outlets to determine how black people have been victimized in the wake of the 2020 crime spike.

“We are seeing an uptick in violent crime across the country, specifically gun violence,” Miami-Dade County Mayor Daniella Levine Cava told The New York Times earlier this month.

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Homicides Skyrocket in Dozens of Nation’s Largest Cities, Analysis Finds

Homicides in 50 of America’s largest cities rose by 24%, a new analysis found.

In total, 36 of 50 of America’s largest cities examined saw a double-digit rise in homicide rates, The Wall Street Journal reported Sunday. Austin and Chicago’s homicide rates have increased more than 50% in comparison to last year’s rates, according to the Journal.

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LGBT Activists Planning Wave of ‘Anti-Discrimination’ Ordinances Across Ohio

After striking out at the state level, LGBT activists are now working at the city level to pass “anti-discrimination” laws across the state. While the state’s largest cities – about 20 of them led by Cleveland, Cincinnati, and Columbus – have over the last few years adopted so-called “anti-discrimination” ordinances…

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Why More Americans Are Moving to Smaller Cities

by Dora Mekouar   More Americans are moving to smaller cities in search of a better quality of life. They’re leaving places like Los Angeles, Chicago and New York for mid-sized cities such as Phoenix and Las Vegas, according to an analysis of data from the U.S. Census Bureau. A…

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