Commentary: Trump’s Trials Don’t Hurt Him in the Polls

Donald Trump at Rally

Donald Trump is out on bail in four jurisdictions facing dozens of felony charges and it does not seem to affect his ratings in the surveys. Many people wonder why.

First of all, let me assure you that Donald Trump is not made of Teflon. Rather, he is probably the most polarizing politician on earth right now. While he does have a very enthusiastic base, a majority of Americans in almost every poll have an unfavorable opinion about him. So it’s not that the various attacks, scandals, allegations, and bad press he has faced ever since he has entered politics have not affected his ratings. They have. Remember that even on the day when he won the presidential election back in 2016, he was the most negatively seen winning presidential candidate in history.

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Groups Sue over Bureau of Land Management Leasing Rule

Deb Haaland

Several groups have sued over a new Bureau of Land Management leasing rule they argue will harm indigenous communities and put small businesses out of business.

Western Energy Alliance, the Independent Petroleum Association of New Mexico, New Mexico Oil and Gas Association, North Dakota Petroleum Council, Petroleum Association of Wyoming, and Utah Petroleum Association sued Secretary of the Interior Deb Haaland and the BLM in the U.S. District Court for the District of Wyoming.

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Feds Secretly Knew for Years Joe Biden Met with Son’s Chinese Partners on Official Trip

Federal agents gathered evidence during the 2016 election that Hunter Biden had used access to his father on an official government trip to Beijing aboard Air Force Two to connect prospective Chinese business partners with then-Vice President Joe Biden, according to a massive cache of documents recently turned over to Congress and obtained by Just the News.

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Norfolk Southern Reaches $310 Million Settlement with EPA, DOJ over East Palestine Derailment

Norfolk Southern reached a $310 million settlement with the Environmental Protection Agency and the Department of Justice on Thursday over a train derailment in East Palestine, Ohio, last year.

The settlement, which has yet to be approved by the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Ohio, requires Norfolk Southern to spend an estimated $235 million for clean-up, $30 million for water quality monitoring, $25 million for a 20-year community health program, and $6 million to prioritize addressing historical pollution through a “waterways remediation plan,” reported the Washington Examiner.

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Obama State Department Blocked FBI from Arresting Iranian Suspects in WMD Probe, Senators Say

Obama Kerry Iran Negotiations in 2015

The senators claimed the reason for the State Department’s interference was because of ongoing negotiations related to the Obama administration’s Iran nuclear deal, which former President Barack Obama signed in 2015.

Republican Sens. Chuck Grassley and Ron Johnson unveiled evidence Wednesday that former Secretary of State John Kerry’s State Department “actively interfered” with the FBI’s attempts to arrest people suspected of being in the United States illegally to support Iran’s efforts to create weapons of mass destruction.

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CIA Prevented Investigators from Interviewing Hunter Biden Lawyer, New IRS Whistleblower Docs Say

Kevin Morris

A new cache of documents from the IRS whistleblowers released Wednesday by the House Ways and Means Committee show how the Central Intelligence Agency directly intervened to prevent the IRS investigators from interviewing Hunter Biden lawyer and benefactor Kevin Morris.

The CIA’s involvement in the case was first suggested in earlier this year when the House Judiciary and Oversight Committees wrote a letter to Director William Burns that revealed impeachment investigators had at least one whistleblower who alleged the spy agency tried to interfere with a witness interview in the case, Just the News previously reported.

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Supreme Court Rules South Carolina Did Not Racially Gerrymander Congressional District Map

The Supreme Court ruled 6-3 Thursday that a lower court “clearly erred” when it held that South Carolina racially gerrymandered its congressional district map.

The majority held that the “circumstantial evidence falls far short of showing that race, not partisan preferences, drove the districting process” behind the creation of the map.

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Prosecution Exhibit List Gives Roadmap of Hunter Biden Trial with References to Influence Scheme

Hunter Biden in courtroom (composite image)

Hundreds of documents and records set to be included as exhibits in Hunter Biden’s California tax trial are designed to prove he violated U.S. tax law, but also include significant evidence previously reported by Just the News and others showing how the younger Biden received millions from foreign sources and which pointing to Joe Biden’s involvement in those deals.

The list, submitted in court by Special Counsel David Weiss, includes several tax documents to bolster the focus of his case, namely, that Hunter Biden’s wrongdoing is centered on tax violations.

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Alan Dershowitz Commentary: I Was Inside the Court When the Judge Closed Trump’s Trial — What I Saw Shocked Me

I have observed and participated in trials throughout the world. I have seen justice and injustice in China, Russia, Ukraine, England, France, Italy, Israel, as well as in nearly 40 of our 50 states.

But in my 60 years as a lawyer and law professor, I have never seen a spectacle such as the one I observed sitting in the front row of the courthouse yesterday.

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Ohio Supreme Court Dismisses Motion Challenging House Bill 68

The Ohio Supreme Court released a decision on Wednesday dismissing an emergency motion filed by Attorney General Dave Yost asking the state’s highest court to narrow a temporary restraining order issued by Franklin County Court of Common Pleas Judge Michael J. Holbrook to block the state from enforcing House Bill 68.

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Northwestern University May Have Broken Federal Law by Failing to Report Crimes During Anti-Israel Protests

Northwestern University student protesters

Northwestern University may have violated a federal law by failing to report crimes on campus at least five times during recent anti-Israel protests.

Northwestern appears to have violated a U.S. law called the Clery Act by not taking and publishing police reports from students who say they were assaulted, battered, stolen from, or witnessed crimes committed by anti-Israel protesters on campus. Failure to do so would allow the university to report lower crime numbers and portray a false picture of campus safety.

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Connecticut Released Illegal Immigrant Convicted of Killing Two Children Despite ICE Detainer

Connecticut law enforcement officials released an illegal immigrant convicted of killing two young children in a drunk driving accident, despite a detainer request lodged against him, according to Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE).

ICE agents apprehended Israel Alejandro Gonzalez-Arcinega, a 40-year-old Mexican national convicted of two counts of manslaughter, illegal operation of a motor vehicle under the influence of alcohol and other crimes in Connecticut, the agency announced in a press release on Monday. ICE is blasting local officials in the state for releasing the noncitizen back into the community despite an immigration detainer placed on him.

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Celebrated Transgender Inmate Charged with Raping Female Months Before Judge Tossed Related Suit

U.S. District Judge Jennifer Thurston

Three days after a federal judge dismissed a challenge to a California law that lets inmates with intact male genitalia and hormone levels choose women’s prisons based on gender identity, prosecutors laid out their evidence for rape charges against an incarcerated male transferred under that law, whom the judge also allowed to intervene in defense of SB 132.

U.S. District Judge Jennifer Thurston “clearly didn’t know about this rape case coming through the state court system” going back to March, Executive Director Sharon Byrne of the Women’s Liberation Front, which sponsored the lawsuit by female inmates Janine Chandler, Krystal Gonzalez, Tomiekia Johnson and Nadia Romero, told Just the News on Monday.

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Michael Cohen’s Testimony Implodes on Prosecutors in New York Trial Against Trump

At the conclusion of key prosecution witness Michael Cohen’s testimony Monday in Donald Trump’s so-called “hush money” trial, jurors were left to ponder a litany of damaging statements that have further cut into Cohen’s credibility and likely made the prosecution’s case harder to prove.

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Commentary: More Defensive Gun Uses Undermine Government Claims About Armed Civilians

Hand Gun

It should be painfully obvious to anyone paying attention that the Biden administration distrusts an armed civilian population and is willing to fudge the truth time and again to defend its untenable positions. But for those living blissfully unaware of the Biden administration’s animosity toward gun owners, it once again demonstrated its animosity in clear terms.

Earlier this month, the Commerce Department’s Bureau of Industry and Security accidentally said the quiet part out loud: It thinks that only the government really can be trusted with firearms, even when the government at issue is notoriously corrupt.

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Federal Judge Blocks Biden ATF Rule Expanding Gun Background Checks

ATF Agents

A federal judge temporarily blocked a background check rule issued by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) Sunday night.

Attorney General Merrick Garland announced the rule covering background checks for firearms purchases April 10, claiming it was based on bipartisan legislation passed in the wake of a deadly school shooting in Uvalde, Texas. United States District Judge Matthew J. Kacsmaryk of the Northern District of Texas issued a temporary restraining order blocking enforcement of the rule until June 2.

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Julie Kelly Commentary: The Audacity of Merrick Garland

FBI agents last week arrested a man from Maine for his involvement in the events of January 6. According to a Department of Justice press release, Lincoln Deming spent about 30 minutes inside the building after entering through an open door with Capitol Police standing by. Deming faces numerous charges including civil disorder and the dreaded “parading” in the Capitol misdemeanor.

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Appeals Court: Parents Cannot Opt K-5 Children Out of Pro-LGBTQ Curriculum

Teacher in Class

On Wednesday, a federal appeals court ruled that parents in Maryland’s largest school district do not have the right to opt their children out of pro-LGBTQ curriculum in the K-5 grades.

As reported by Fox News, the 2-1 ruling by the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals upheld a previous decision by a lower court, which denied the parents a preliminary injunction based on their alleged failure to prove that the policy would constitute a violation of the First Amendment right to freedom of religion.

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Biden Attempt to Hide Tapes to Collide with Precedent from Past Democratic Probes

President Joe Biden’s attempt to assert executive privilege over the tapes of his interview with federal investigators in his own classified documents case could run into the history of Democratic tactics to obtain information from former President Trump.

For example, recent court decisions surrounding Trump’s efforts to invoke executive privilege over subpoenaed documents by the Jan. 6 Select Committee confirmed a legitimate congressional investigation is often a strong basis for requesting documents or information from the executive. Though, Biden’s current control of the executive branch may allow him to stonewall successfully.

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Report: Medical Schools Secretly Defying Supreme Court’s Ruling on Affirmative Action

Medical Students

A coalition of medical professionals revealed the methods by which medical schools across the country are circumventing the Supreme Court’s ruling outlawing the practice of affirmative action, and employing such race-based policies anyway.

According to Fox News, the group Do No Harm released new research this week revealing that “many in the healthcare establishment nevertheless remain ideologically committed to the principle of racial favoritism and reject the virtue of race blindness.” This comes despite the Supreme Court’s landmark decision last year in the case Students for Fair Admissions v. Harvard, which determined that affirmative action, the practice of admitting students or hiring staff based solely on their race, was unconstitutional.

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Missouri AG Claims Kansas City Doxxed Chiefs Kicker over Religious Views

Harrison Butker

Missouri Attorney General Andrew Bailey accused Kansas City on Thursday of doxxing one of its NFL players over religious comments he made at a college over the weekend, where he criticized President Joe Biden for being a pro-abortion Catholic.

The city of Kansas City, which is primarily in Missouri, posted a since-deleted “reminder” that Kansas City Chiefs kicker Harrison Butker lives in Lee Summit on Wednesday, but replaced it with an apology for the “error.” The city account did not include a physical address in the original post.

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Commentary: Defund and Investigate Jack Smith

Jack Smith

Special Counsel Jack Smith was supposed to be basking in glory right now.

In his ideal world, Smith would be hot off a quick conviction of Donald Trump in Washington, D.C. for the former president’s alleged role in the events of January 6 and attempts to “overturn” the 2020 election. The special counsel then would have immediately moved his victorious prosecutors to Palm Beach for the summer to prepare for Trump’s second federal trial related to allegedly stealing national defense information and impeding the Department of Justice’s investigation.

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Attorneys Tell CNN Trump Defense ‘Knocked’ Michael Cohen Down and Put Him ‘On the Mat’

CNN legal analyst Joey Jackson and criminal defense attorney Bill Brennan, who previously represented former President Donald Trump, said that Manhattan District Attorney Alvin Bragg’s star witness Michael Cohen experienced a beatdown on Thursday.

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Biden Invokes Executive Privilege to Prevent Release of Recording with Special Counsel Hur

President Joe Biden on Thursday claimed the recording of his interview with Special Counsel Robert Hur about his retention of classified documents should not be released due to executive privilege just hours before House Republicans were set to move toward holding Attorney General Merrick Garland in contempt of Congress for not releasing the recordings.

The Justice Department’s Legal Counsel Office said the recording should be considered protected by executive privilege, and Garland should not be punished for not releasing it, Associate Attorney General Carlos Uriatre said.

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Republicans Sound Alarm on RNC Security, Secret Service Turns Deaf Ear

Secret Service Director Kimberly Cheatle

Republican lawmakers have approached the U.S. Secret Service with concerns about security issues at July’s Republican National Convention in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, but Secret Service has so far been unwilling to compromise, sources told the Daily Caller.

“We have identified a critical flaw with the Security Perimeter that creates an elevated and untenable safety risk to the attending public,” counsel to the Republican National Committee Todd R. Steggerda wrote to Secret Service Director Kimberly Cheatle in April.

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As Trump’s Trial Sucks Up Air Time, Hunter Biden Could Be Hurtling Toward Multiple Felony Convictions

Hunter Biden in courtroom (composite image)

Just a few hours south of the Manhattan courthouse where Democratic District Attorney Alvin Bragg’s team is attempting to secure a guilty verdict in the first criminal trial of a former president, another high-profile trial is slated to begin this summer. That trial could also deliver a seismic verdict ahead of the 2024 election: a felony conviction for President Joe Biden’s son.

For weeks, the Manhattan courthouse has served as the de-facto center of Trump’s campaign as he dispatches daily remarks to press in the hallway ahead of entering the courtroom, where he is required to stay for the duration of the trial proceedings. While Trump’s trial has dominated headlines with salacious witness testimony, a gag order that prevents Trump from responding to political attacks by witnesses and an unclear central charge that has led many to criticize Bragg for bringing the case at all, Hunter Biden will face his own trial on felony gun charges next month.

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Oversight Committee Chairman Comer Says House Has Enough Votes to Hold Garland in Contempt

House Oversight Committee Chairman James Comer, R-Ky., says he believes the House has enough votes to hold U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland in contempt.

“Absolutely,” Comer answered when asked about the votes on the Wednesday edition of the “Just the News, No Noise” TV show. “I think the Judiciary Committee [is] going to do the same thing. We’ve worked together, both the Oversight and Judiciary Committee, on a lot of things throughout this whole Biden influence peddling investigation. And remember, the Oversight Committee was one of the first out there that recognized that Joe Biden mishandled classified documents.”

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FBI Report Finds Fewer Officers Killed in Line of Duty, but More Attacked

There were 60 officers killed in the line of duty in 2023, the report said, one less than in 2022. But the total officers killed in the line of duty in the past three years were higher than any other three year period in the past two decades.

An FBI report released Tuesday revealed that fewer law enforcement officers were killed in the line of duty last year, but the number of attacks on officers has risen.

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Pro-Life Activist Sentenced to Almost Five Years in Prison over D.C. Clinic Blockade

Lauren Handy

Handy was convicted last year on two charges under the Freedom of Access to Clinic Entrances Act.

Pro-life activist Lauren Handy was sentenced to four years and nine months in prison on Tuesday for organizing a blockade at an abortion clinic in 2020 in Washington, D.C.

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Commentary: Faulty U.S. Crime Stats Make It Hard to Know What to Believe

Americans can be forgiven for suffering from whiplash regarding law and order.

In recent weeks the Biden administration and many news outlets, including USA Today and The Hill, have touted declines in violent crime statistics to argue that America is becoming a safer place.

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Disbarred Michael Cohen’s Testimony Did Little to Help Bragg’s Case, Credibility Still a Problem

Michael Cohen’s opening day of testimony—much like other witnesses—appeared to do little to bolster Manhattan District Attorney Alvin Bragg’s case against former President Donald Trump, which at least one legal expert assesses is weak.

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Commentary: The Fall of the House of Presidential Persecutions

None of the five civil and criminal cases currently lodged against former President Donald Trump have ever had merit. They were all predicated on using the law to injure his re-election candidacy—given a widespread derangement syndrome among the left and a fear they cannot entrust a Trump/Biden election to the people.

These criminal and civil trials are merely the continuation of extra-legal efforts of the last eight years to destroy a presidential candidate in lieu of opposing him in transparent elections.

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Arrest of Transgender Former Student Who Allegedly Threatened Nashville’s Christ Presbyterian Academy Raises Troubling Parallels to Covenant Killer

The recent arrest of McKenzie McClure, the biological female and former Christ Presbyterian Academy (CPA) student federal authorities accused of cyberstalking following alleged threats to CPA in Nashville, shares concerning similarities with the circumstances which preceded the tragic Covenant School shootings by former Covenant School student Audrey Elizabeth Hale last year.

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Coalition of 22 State AGs Call on Biden to Reject Treaty Drastically Expanding WHO Authority

Biden WHO

A coalition of 22 state attorneys general have sent a letter to Joe Biden voicing their opposition to the World Health Organization’s (WHO) proposed pandemic treaty and amendments to the International Health Regulations (IHR).

Attorneys general from Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, and West Virginia, led by Montana Attorney General Austin Knudsen, raised concerns that the proposed agreement threatens U.S. sovereignty by giving the WHO “unprecedented and unconstitutional powers over the people of the United States.”

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Black Lives Matter Group Sues Massive Liberal Foundation Claiming ‘Egregious Mismanagement’ of $33 Million in Funds

BLM

A liberal foundation controlling roughly $1 billion in assets faces accusations of “egregious mismanagement” of funds from the largest Black Lives Matter group in the country.

Black Lives Matter Global Network Foundation (BLM GNF) filed a lawsuit on Monday accusing the Tides Foundation of mishandling funds donated to a “Black Lives Matter Support Fund” administered by Tides, arguing the funds belong to them. Tides, however, contests this by claiming that donations to the fund were actually intended for smaller BLM organizations.

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Justice Department Sues Iowa over Immigration Law After Warning

Kim Reynolds

The Justice Department sued the state of Iowa on Thursday, after the state failed to stop a new immigration law that makes it a crime for people to be in the state if they were previously denied admission to the United States.

The lawsuit is the second legal action taken against the state over the new law, which goes into effect in July. The first was a lawsuit from a civil rights group that was filed earlier Thursday. The department warned Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds that it would sue last week if she did not stop the law by May 7.

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Commentary: Judge Cannon Puts Jack Smith on Trial

Jack Smith

U.S. District Court Judge Aileen Cannon may have just indefinitely postponed Donald Trump’s espionage and obstruction trial but that doesn’t mean her federal courtroom in Fort Pierce, Florida will lie dormant over the next few months.

In officially vacating the existing May 20 trial date—an impossibility considering the defendant will be in a Manhattan courtroom for the foreseeable future—Cannon declined to set another date, calling it “imprudent” at this stage of the process. She noted a “myriad” of unresolved matters in Special Counsel Jack Smith’s 42-count indictment against the former president and his two co-defendants, Mar-a-Lago employees Waltine Nauta and Carlos De Olivera, for willfully retaining national defense information and attempting to impede the government’s investigation.

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Lawyer for Steve Bannon Releases Statement After Appeals Court Upholds Bannon’s January 6 Contempt Conviction

The Court of Appeals panel held today that it does not have the authority to overrule the 1961 panel of the Court that issued the decision in the Licavoli case on the definition of the word “willfully” as used in the Contempt of Congress statute.  Mr. Bannon will now seek redress before the full Court of Appeals, which has the authority to overrule Licavoli.

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Missouri AG Demands DOJ Turn Over Communications Relating to Prosecutions of Former President Trump

Missouri Attorney General Andrew Bailey filed a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request for Department of Justice records relating to the investigation or prosecutions of former President Donald Trump on Thursday.

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Trump Civil Fraud Judge’s Talks with Attorney Under Investigation by Ethics Commission: Report

The New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct is investigating an alleged interaction between a New York real estate lawyer and the judge who issued a $454 million judgement against former President Donald Trump, according to NBC New York.

Real estate lawyer Adam Leitman Bailey said he had a conversation with Judge Arthur Engoron a few weeks before the judge’s decision was due, NBC New York reported. Democratic Attorney General Letitia James of New York sued Trump in September 2022, alleging he overstated the value of real estate holdings in order to obtain loans.

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Trump Finds Success in Court with Three of Four Cases Facing Significant Delays

Donald Trump

At one time, unfavorable outcomes in the four court cases against former President Donald Trump seemed likely to be politically damaging for the three-time campaigner, but as the cases have faced scrutiny and delays, public opinion has recently shifted.

Yesterday, the Georgia Appeals Court agreed to hear an appeal in the state election case brought by controversial Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis. Earlier this week, a Florida judge indefinitely suspended the federal trial in the classified documents case.

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Jordan Demands Nathan Wade Testify over Fani Willis Prosecution of Trump

Nathan Wade

Wade served as a special prosecutor on Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis’s prosecution of Trump and 18 codefendants over his efforts to challenge the 2020 election results in the Peach State.

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jim Jordan asked that former special prosecutor Nathan Wade testify before the panel as to his role in an ongoing criminal case against former President Donald Trump.

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Two-Thirds of University Protesters Arrested Weren’t Even Students, Police Say

The majority of people arrested by the Metropolitan Police Department (MPD) while clearing a pro-Palestinian encampment at George Washington University (GWU) were not students, D.C. Police Chief Pamela Smith said on Thursday.

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Commentary: Manhattan Is on Trial

Donald Trump

Like so many Americanos, I’m spending more time than I should listening to news out of Manhattan, where the local prosecutor there has charged the leading Republican candidate for president with 34 felony counts of being Donald Trump. I challenge anyone to find more than this in the charges and specifications. I really should ration myself on trial news. I could even take a day off. I’m beginning to know how Bill Murray’s character in Groundhog Day must have felt as though the news out of the trial is pretty much the same from day to day.

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Laken Riley’s Alleged Killer Indicted, Also Accused of Being ‘Peeping Tom’

A Georgia grand jury has formally indicted the man accused of killing 22-year-old student Laken Riley on ten charges, including murder, kidnapping and being a peeping Tom.

Jose Ibarra is charged with malice murder, three counts of felony murder, kidnapping, aggravated assault, aggravated battery, tampering with evidence and interfering with a 911 call for help, Superior Court of Clarke County records show. The 26-year-old Venezuelan national was also handed down a “peeping Tom” charge related to his activities the day of Riley’s murder.

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CNN’s Elie Honig Says Stormy Daniels’ Responses Were ‘Disastrous’ for Alvin Bragg’s Case

Elie Honig

CNN legal analyst Elie Honig said porn star Stormy Daniels’ responses to attorneys for former President Donald Trump were “disastrous” for the prosecution’s case.

Daniels testified Tuesday about her alleged relationship with Trump, providing salacious and irrelevant details that prompted Trump’s attorneys to move for a mistrial, which New York Judge Juan Merchan rejected. Honig said that the cross-examination of Daniels by Trump’s attorneys “went poorly” for Democratic Manhattan District Attorney Alvin Bragg.

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TikTok Sues U.S. Government over New Law Banning App

TikTok User

On Tuesday, the Chinese social media app TikTok and its parent company filed a lawsuit against the federal government of the United States over a new law threatening to ban the app if it is not sold to another company by next year.

ABC News reports that the lawsuit, filed by TikTok and its Chinese parent company ByteDance, claims the new law is a violation of the First Amendment rights of TikTok’s users. The bill was signed into law by Joe Biden last month, with the TikTok ban being one provision of a larger $95 billion foreign aid package. The law requires ByteDance to sell TikTok within 9 months, or else the app will be banned from use in the United States.

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